• Early morning start for shark tracking.
  • Common dolphins are active predators and their diet mainly consists of squid and small schooling fish, such as anchovies, sardines and pilchards.
  • Ed and Heather on the look-out for sharks, whales and seals!
  • A happy shark biologist, skipper and crew member!
  • Lovely new accomodation!
  • The equipment used for tracking sharks.
  • The beautiful sand dunes at Kleinbaai.
  • Happy faces after a shark cage dive!
  • Similar to a whale, Great White Sharks will often stick their heads out of the water to inspect their prey. This is known as spy-hopping.
  • Another happy crew member!
  • Threats to the great white shark include commercial and sport fishing for their fins (which are used in shark fin soup) and jaws (which are often hunting trophies); accidental entanglement in protective beach mesh and commercial fishing nets.
  • A Cape fur seal plays around in Shark Alley.
  • A volunteer spots a Southern Right Whale in the distance.
  • A volunteer capturing data.
  • Great White Shark lunges at a seal decoy.
  • Southern Right Whales often breach multiple times in a row.
  • The seal decoy with all the shark's teeth marks!
  • Walking on the sand dunes near Kleinbaai.
  • Great white sharks  have six senses: sight, smell, taste, touch, hearing and electro-reception.
  • When you volunteer you become a member of the crew!
  • Great White Sharks rarely attack people and when they do, it is because they mistaken the person for their usual seal prey.
  • Another happy volunteer dries off after her shark cage dive.
  • Great White Sharks often emerge from the deep like this to surprise seals.
  • Wow - getting really close to a southern right whale!
  • A Great White Shark may use and lose more than one thousand teeth in its life time.
  • Experience the thrill of viewing the giants of the deep close up, by taking a boat based whale-watching trip.
  • Volunteers being briefed on shark conservation issues.
  • Great White shark diving in South Africa has in recent years become one of the most popular extreme sports.
  • After birth, Great White Shark pups receive no parental care and are left to fend for themselves.
  • Southern Right Whales eat over 2,000 pounds (about 900kg) of planktonic organisms each day!
  • Volunteers observe sharks approaching the boat.
  • Yay!! I love shark cage diving!
  • Getting ready... Few things compare to the adrenalin rush and exhilaration one gets from being face to face with a 3 m Great White, especially when they curiously cruise right up to the cage and eye you out!
  • Dropping probes that are connected to the telemetric device used to track sharks.
  • Known as one of the ocean's greatest predators, the Great White Shark has grown to become quite a hit amongst travellers and tourists through Shark Cage Diving.
  • Great Whites often have scratches and scars on their snouts which resulted from their prey fighting back.
  • Watching seals in Shark Alley next to Dyer Island.
  • The Dyer Island Conservation Trust  strive to protect the largest surviving colonies of the endangered African Penguin whose numbers are at an all-time low.
  • Southern Right Whales can be found in very shallow water including estuaries and bays.
  • Great White Sharks grow very slowly and only become sexually mature around 8 - 10 years (males) and 14 - 16 years (females).
  • Great White Sharks are sensitive to low frequency sounds as produced by struggling prey.
  • Ed and his sister Bridget having fun in the shark cage!
  • Southern Right Whales are among the slowest swimming whales.
  • A volunteer capturing data for shark fin profiling.
  • Although the Great White Shark can reach lengths of up to 6m, it is not the largest shark in the ocean, but it is the biggest predatory shark.
  • Watching a beautiful sunrise before shark tracking begins.
  • Like many other large whale species, the southern right whale migrates between warmer, low-latitude breeding grounds and colder, high-latitude feeding grounds.
  • Great White Sharks can breach out the water over 2 m into the air.
  • Common dolphins are frequently seen on Great White Shark trips and are widely distributed in the offshore waters along the entire coast of South Africa.
  • Great White Sharks don't have eyelids, but instead roll their eyes back to protect them.
  • Lots of amazing memories are made on these boat trips!
  • Dyer Island is a protected bird sanctuary and houses a large colony of African Penguins - about 25 000 pairs.
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