• A beautiful sunset at our exciting, affordable Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park, South Africa.
  • Everyone washes their own dishes at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa as well as helping to keep the kitchen area clean and tidy.
  • The African buffalo is fearless and has an unpredictable nature, making it highly dangerous to humans. It is part of the Big Five and  likely to be seen while participating in the wildlife conservation Elephant and Rhino volunteer.
  • Elephants can live for up to 70 years. The Africa Elephant is the largest of all land mammals and consume as much as 135 - 225 kg of food per day! Wildlife conservation at it's best!
  • Elephants prefer one tusk over the other, just as people are either left or right-handed. Come and check out these amazing animals at the wildlife conservation Elephant and Rhino Monitoring volunteer Project in South Africa.
  • Vervets are distinguished by their characteristic black face, bordered by a white fringe. They are born with a pink face and black hair. They take on the greyish-green color like that of the adults after 4 months.
  • Part of an elephant skull.
  • Kudu's are browsers and eat leaves and shoots from a variety of plants.
  • The cheetah is the fastest land animal in the world, reaching speeds of up to 113km/h. They can accelerate from 0 to 100km/h in just 3 seconds.
  • The distinctive spots that cover a giraffe's fur act as a good camouflage to protect the giraffe from predators. When the giraffe stands in front of trees and bushes the light and dark colouring of its fur blends in with the shadows and sunlight.
  • The camp site at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project before the fire gets going!
  • Giraffes are ruminants. This means that they have more than one stomach. In fact, giraffes have four stomachs, the extra stomachs assisting with digesting food. Come and see these beautiful wild animals at our Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project.
  • Both black and white rhinoceroses are actually grey. They are different not in colour but in lip shape. The black rhino has a pointed upper lip, while its white relative has a squared lip. The difference in lip shape is related to the animals' diets.
  • Zebras have excellent eyesight and hearing and  stand up while sleeping. Because young zebras are particularly vulnerable to predators, the ability to run so shortly after birth is crucial to his survival.
  • Although a giraffe's neck is 1.5 - 1.8 metres, it contains the same number of vertebrae as a human neck.
  • African elephants may eat up to 450 kilograms (992 lb) of vegetation per day, although their digestive system is not very efficient; only 40 percent of this food is properly digested.
  • Did you know that elephants are the largest land animals in the world? Why not take  a  gap year and come and check them out at our Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa!
  • Baby Giraffes can stand within half an hour and after only 10 hours can actually run alongside their family! You will get to see many of these magnificent creatures if you join the Elephant and Rhino monitoring project near Kruger!
  • The name rhinoceros means 'nose horn' and is often shortened to rhino. At around 3 years old, the calf will set out on its own. A rhino can live up to 45 years.
  • Outdoor showers with beautiful views!
  • Collaring an elephant to monitor it's movements at our affordable Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • Elephants normally walk about 6.5 km per hour. They are able to swim for long distances and spend about 16 hours a day eating.
  • African lions are one of the Big Five, the most social of all big cats and live together in groups called prides. A pride consists of about 15 lions. Come and enjoy these cats in the wild - where they should be!
  • Drinking is one of the most dangerous times for a giraffe. While it is getting a drink it cannot keep a look out for predators and is vulnerable to attack. Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • Most young impala are born around mid-day as this is the safest time to give birth since most of their enemies are resting. Half of newborn are killed by predators within the first few weeks of life.
  • The giraffe is the tallest mammal in the world, with even new-born babies being taller than most humans.
  • Lions are very social compared to other cat species, often living in prides that feature females, offspring and a few adult males. Come and see them in the wild at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • An elephant's trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things. The trunk alone contains about 100,000 different muscles.
  • Kitchen, campfire and meeting place area at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • Taking a break in beautiful surroundings while voluteering at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • Volunteers head out to track rhino at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa. Such an amazing experience!
  • Although basic, the rooms at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project have a bed, table and camping cupboard for your comfort.
  • A volunteer at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa using a telemetry device to track rhino's and elephants.
  • The elephant's eyes are small and its eyesight is poor. They have the largest brains in the animal kingdom.
  • A volunteer using a telemetry device to track rhino's and elephants at our Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park, South Africa.
  • Happy hippo's! Participation in the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project is an affordable way to see South Africa's amazing wildlife!
  • Volunteering at the Elephant and Rhino project in South Africa during your gap year will keep you fit and healthy!
  • Buffalo are capable swimmers and often cross deep water in search of better grazing.
  • Male lions defend the pride's territory while females do most of the hunting. Despite this, the males eat first.
  • Volunteers at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa don't want to go home!
  • Enjoying the camp fire at night at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • A real African wildlife experience includes a lot more than enjoying the Big 5. As a volunteer with the Elephant & Rhino Monitoring Project you will be introduced to an amazing variety of insects, birds and frogs too!
  • A giraffe fell into a water hole (well) and needed to be rescued. Well done, everyone!
  • The elephant is the only mammal that can't jump! Join our affordable Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project to see the rest of the Big Five!
  • African elephants are highly intelligent, and they have a very large and highly convoluted neocortex, a trait they share with humans, apes and some dolphin species.
  • Giraffes are sociable, peaceful animals which rarely fight. Males do perform a behaviour called 'necking' where they will hit necks; however these encounters rarely last more than a couple of minutes and seldom result in injury.
  • At the Elephant & Rhino Monitoring Project, volunteers often get involved in Environmental Education classes.
  • All safe and sound! This giraffe fell into a water hole (well) and had to be rescued.
  • Elephant and other amazing wild animals often stroll through camp at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park, South Africa.
  • The kitchen is basic but has a fridge and a gas 2 plate stove available.
  • Elephant feet are covered in a soft padding that help uphold their weight, prevent them from slipping, and dull any sound. Therefore elephants can walk almost silently!
  • Volunteers checking out an elephant's trunk. Elephants are the only animals that can snorkel without aid. By holding the tips of their trunks above the water's surface, elephants can traverse rivers totally submerged.
  • A leopard's body is built for hunting. They have sleek, powerful bodies and can run at speeds of up to 57 kilometres per hour. They are also excellent swimmers and climbers and can leap and jump long distances.
  • A regular problem while volunteering here is coping with road blocks during the morning rush hour.
  • Cape buffalo are one of the most dangerous and heaviest hoofed animals in Africa. Both the males and females have large curved horns that are sharply pointed. These horns can be deadly to predators, like lions.
  • Wow - check out the giraffe, zebra and wildebeest (gnu)! You'll get to see lots more amazing wildlife while at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park, South Africa.
  • An ostrich's brain is smaller than its eye - it would hardly fill a teaspoon!
  • Just like snowflakes and human fingerprints, no two giraffes have the same spot pattern.
  • Elephants can swim - they use their trunk to breathe like a snorkel in deep water. Visit our affordable Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa and get to see these wonderful creatures close up.
  • Because giraffes are built the way they are, drinking can pose serious problems for them. To get to water, they need to spread their front legs and crane their neck down at an awkward angle, a position that leaves them vulnerable.
  • How about joining the Elephant and Rhino monitoring project near Kruger National Park in South Africa while on your gap year abroad?  You won't want to leave!
  • Thatched roof twin share accommodation units keep you safe from the wild animals at night when participating in the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project. It's not advisable to got to the toilet in the middle of the night!
  • When an elephant drinks, it sucks as much as 2 gallons (7.5 liters) of water into its trunk at a time. Then it curls its trunk under, sticks the tip of its trunk into its mouth, and blows. Out comes the water, right down the elephant's throat.
  • A turtle hitching a ride on a hippo! An adult hippo needs to resurface every 3 - 5mins to breathe. The process of surfacing and breathing is automatic, and even a hippo sleeping underwater will rise and breathe without waking.
  • The black rhino is considered the most aggressive species of its family and, despite its massive bulk, they can charge at great speeds of 50km per hour at an unwary observer.
  • When volunteering at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa, you have an excellent chance of bumping into members of the Big Five!
  • The elephants' tusks are firm teeth; the second set of incisors become the tusks. They are used for digging for roots and stripping the bark from trees for food; for fighting each other during mating season; and for defending themselves.
  • The toilet is open to the elements at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa but at least it flushes!
  • What a cool thing to do in your gap year! Sitting round the fire after a hard day's work checking out the wildlife at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project, South Africa.
  • This Western Stripe-bellied sand sanke was spotter by volunteers on a rhino monitoring trip at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park. This is probably the fastest snake in South Africa.
  • This giraffe had just been rescued from a water hole (well) that it had fallen into. Great to see him up on his feet again!
  • A Woodland Kingfisher at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project, South Africa.
  • Solar panels provide electricity for charging phones, computers etc. at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa.
  • Checking out the giraffe at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project near Kruger National Park in South Africa. Such a treat to sit and observe them in the wild!
  • Giraffes spend most of their lives standing up; they even sleep and give birth standing up.
  • When they are in a herd, the zebra's distinct stripes merge into a big mass and make it hard for predators to single out individual animals. To see and hear these beautiful wild animals gallop across the game reserve is such a treat!
  • Working hard and keeping out the midday sun at the affordable Elephant and Rhino monitoring project near the Kruger National Park, South  Africa.
  • The hair that makes up a giraffes tail is about 10 times thicker than the average strand of human hair. Come and check out these gorgeous animals at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in South Africa in your gap year abroad!
  • All washed up after a delicious camp fire meal at the Elephant and Rhino Monitoring Project in the greater Kruger National Park.
  • Elephants wave their trunks up in the air and from side to side to smell better. The trunk is able to sense the size, shape and temperature of an object. An elephant uses its trunk to lift food and suck up water then pour it into its mouth.
  • Elephants do not have sweat glands. They have 6 sets of molar teeth; when the last set is lost, the animal is unable to eat and eventually dies.
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