• Taking water samples.
  • Cape white-eyes are diurnal and are known for being extremely social and for their frequent, loud vocalizations. They are rarely seen alone and are mostly accompanied by a mate or large flock.
  • The restaurant over the road from the Nature's Valley Beach.
  • Looking out over Nature's Valley.
  • What could be better than an outdoor classroom? Children from a local school came to Nature's Valley Beach to learn more about the rock pools.
  • Despite it's name, the Oyster Catcher seldom eats oysters. At low tide, it forages along rocky shorelines, looking for other molluscs-mostly limpets and mussels.
  • Pupils from a local school having fun in an outdoor classroom!
  • These baboons can grow up to 120 centimetres tall, weigh up to 40 kilograms and live for up to 30 years.
  • The Cape white-eye feeds mainly on insects, but also spiders and their eggs, soft fleshy flowers, nectar, fruit, pollen, and small grains.
  • The walkway down to Nature's Valley Beach.
  • A sea urchin skeleton.
  • The walkway down to Nature's Valley Beach.
  • After the birds are caught in very fine nets, they are put into these bags while waiting to be ringed, have their sugar levels tested etc.
  • Humpback whales are powerful swimmers, and they use their massive tail fin, called a fluke, to propel themselves through the water and sometimes completely out of it.
  • Outdoor education with children from a local school.
  • The mosquito fish is an alien species that is invading the river and estuary.
  • This mosquito fish is only 8mm long!
  • Leucospermum is a genus of about 50 species of flowering plants in the family Proteaceae, native to South Africa, where they occupy a variety of habitats, including scrub, forest, and mountain slopes.
  • Releasing a Sugarbird after being tagged.
  • Catching mosquito fish in order to gather information for the survey of this alien species.
  • The staple diet of the Cape sugarbird is nectar; however, it will also eat spiders and insects.
  • A tortoise.
  • Outdoor education with children from a local school.
  • Coral seaweed.
  • White breasted cormorants are excellent swimmers and float low in the water, with only their head and neck showing.
  • The amethyst sunbird eats nectar supplemented with insects, foraging wherever nectar is available. It often hawks flying insects from the trees or bushes, also gleaning them from leaves and branches.
  • Sunset at Nature's Valley.
  • Ringing or banding is the process of attaching a small, individually numbered metal or plastic tag to the leg or wing of a wild bird. This enables the individual bird to be identified should it later be recaptured or recovered.
  • Children from a local school using information for identification purposes.
  • An egg case or egg capsule, colloquially known as a mermaid's purse or devil's purse, is a casing that surrounds the fertilized eggs of some sharks, skates, and chimaeras. They are among the common objects which are washed up by the sea.
  • The orange breasted sunbird's long thin down-curved bills and brush-tipped tubular tongues are perfectly adapted for retrieving nectar from the flowers.
  • A pupil from a local school having a look at  an empty shark case.
  • Heather, keeping a note of information for the survey of the alien Mosquito fish species.
  • A beautiful sunset at Nature's Valley.
  • The estuary behind the Nature's Valley Beach.
View more photo albums